What is Your Social Security Card and Why Is It Important?

social security card

It is nearly impossible to live in the United States without a social security number. From getting hired to opening a new bank account, you will need a social security number. The federal government makes use of this social security number to track down the entire income in a lifetime of the citizens of United States. Your social security contribution and taxation details are all stored under this number.

What is a Social Security Number?

A social security number is a unique nine-digit number that comes with the social security card issued by the administration to the citizens and permanent residents of the United States. To avail federal government benefits, you will have to provide this social security number.

No two persons or citizens of the United States will have the same social security number. This makes it quite easier for the government to track down all individuals very easily.

your social security card is used to ensure your status and allocate benefits during hiring for a job

Used for Identification During Hiring

After multiple technical rounds and processes getting hired by a company is a herculean task. But to keep that job in hand becomes furthermore difficult if you do not have a social security number. Your employer is required by law to submit your income details to the internal revenue service, and for fulfilling that purpose, he will require your social security number. So to get hired social security number is essential.

Identification for Availing Social Security Benefits

The most common and important social security benefits are social security retirement benefits, social security disability benefits, and social security survivor benefits.

During the time of your retirement with the help of your social security number, your contribution to social security will be calculated, and payments will be made to you.

If something should go wrong at your workplace that leaves you disabled to work, you can avail the social security disability benefits with the social security number.

In case of any unfortunate event resulting in the death of a worker during his tenure, his benefactors can apply for the social security survivor benefits with the help of the demised worker’s social security number.

hold on to your social security card historical poster

History of Social Security Number

For the citizens of the United States, the social security number has become a kind of universal identification. The history of the Social Security Card dates back to 1936 when the US Government wanted to track the earnings histories of workers who were migrating to different parts of the country. Since the different number was allocated to all individuals, it was quite easy to identify individuals, the locations where they lived and their benefactors. 

To have a smooth and easy life in the United States, it is a must to obtain the social security number. All federal government benefits can be availed with a social security number. In case if you are not a citizen of the United States but are legally working in the United States, you can apply and obtain a restricted social security number.

How Your Social Security Number Was Generated

Prior to 2011, your social security number was generated using the following formula:

1) The first three numbers are the zip code of the Social Security Office that issued your card. 

2) The next two numbers are your "Group Number" and range from 01 to 99. This is assigned based on the order of people who applied for a number in your specific area.

3) The last four numbers are referred to as your "serial number" and are issued based on the order that each application was processed.

For those born after 2011, the Social Security Administration has created a randomized numbering system that makes it far more difficult for hackers to guess your number based on data available.

 

 

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