Things to Know Before Moving to Hawaii: Pros and Cons of Retiring in Paradise

What to know if you are thinking about moving to Hawaii
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Hawaii is often called "paradise" and for good reason. With its stunning beaches, lush tropical jungles, and friendly locals, it's no wonder why so many people dream of moving there one day. But before you grab your flip flops and start your new life in the Aloha State, there are a few things you should know. In this blog post, we will discuss some of the pros and cons of retiring in Hawaii as well as tips for raising a family in this beautiful but sometimes challenging place.

Why Move To Hawaii

For starters, it's one of the most beautiful places on earth. This is one of the first things that draws people to the island and why it is so easy to catch island fever.

From the turquoise waters and palm trees of Kauai to the black sand beaches of Maui, there is no shortage of natural beauty to enjoy in this tropical paradise. The climate is also very mild, which makes it a great place to retire if you're looking for a warmer climate. In addition, Hawaii is home to some of the best beaches in the world and has an abundance of activities to keep you busy, from hiking and surfing to exploring volcanoes and snorkeling with sea turtles.

On the downside, living in Hawaii can be expensive. Prices for everything from groceries to housing are high, so you'll need to have a good income or savings before making the big move.

Additionally, the cost of living can vary greatly from one island to another, so you'll need to do your research to figure out which island is right for you. And finally, while the weather is usually beautiful, Hawaii does experience hurricanes and tropical storms from time to time, so you'll need to be prepared for that as well.

 

Figuring Out Which of The Hawaiian Islands Is Right For You

The first step is deciding which island is right for the way of life you are seeking. There are eight major islands in Hawaii, and each has its own unique personality. Many visitors think of the Hawaiian Islands as being all the same but they are each unique. This is good news for people seeking an island lifestyle since there is something for everyone from small island living to big cities.

 

The Big Island

Hawaii Island is home to Kona and Hilo as well as Kilauea, one of the world's most famous volcanoes, the Big Island is the largest of all the Hawaiian Islands. It's also one of the most diverse, with everything from snow-capped mountains to black sand beaches. Unless you've had the opportunity to explore it by car, it is hard to understand just how big this island is. With a land mass of 4,028 square miles it is home to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and four other national parks as well.

Oahu

The island of Oahu is the most populous island and home to the state capital of Honolulu as well as world-famous Waikiki Beach and of course Pearl Harbor.

Maui

Maui is a popular tourist destination with its black sand beaches, Haleakala National Park, and Road to Hana scenic drive. The Big Island of Hawaii is the largest island in the state and boasts 11 different climate zones, from tropical rainforests to snow-capped mountains.

Kaua'i

Kaua'i is the oldest and northernmost island in the Hawaiian chain. It's known for its dramatic cliffs, pristine beaches, and lush rainforests.

Lanai

Lanai is a small but beautiful island that was once an island-wide pineapple plantation and today is mostly owned by billionaire Larry Ellison along with a handful of the most luxurious resorts found anywhere in Hawaii.

Molokai

Molokai is a quiet island with pristine beaches and dramatic sea cliffs. Kahoolawe is a small, uninhabited island that was used as a military training ground for many years.

So which island is right for you? It really depends on what you're looking for in a Hawaiian experience. If you want to be surrounded by natural beauty, Kauai or The Big Island might be your best bet. If you're looking for world-class beaches and surfing, Oahu or Maui would be more your style.

 

How To Move Your Car, Home Goods, and Other Stuff

Now that you've decided which Hawaiian island is right for you, it's time to start planning your move. If you're moving from the mainland United States, there are a few things you need to know before shipping your belongings to Hawaii. As things are far more complicated when it comes to moving to Hawaii - it is important that you select a moving company that understands the complexities and can guide you through the process.

First of all, it's important to research which items are allowed and prohibited by the state of Hawaii. There are certain restrictions on items like plants, animals, firearms, and ammunition, so be sure to check the list before packing up your things.

Additionally, it's important to choose a reputable shipping company that has experience shipping to Hawaii. This will ensure that your belongings arrive safely and on time. Finally, make sure you have adequate insurance coverage for your things as they travel across the Pacific Ocean

You should also be prepared to pay much more for moving your belongings to Hawaii since it's more complicated than simply throwing stuff into a moving van and heading down the highway. Instead, your items will need to be packed into a shipping container and be transported by ship.

For example, you simply can't drive your car from California, you'll have to ship your car to Hawaii instead. The cost for this can be as high as $2,000 and may take several weeks, depending on where you are moving to Hawaii from and what island you are relocating to.

 

The Pros Of Retiring In Hawaii

For many, the idea of moving to Hawaii is a fantasy that can become a reality with some planning. Despite the high cost of living being an obstacle for many - in comparison to West Coast cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego, Honolulu on the island of Oahu isn't really that bad.

Benefits Of Retiring In Hawaii Include:

-The climate is mild, which makes it a great place to retire if you're looking for a warmer climate.

-Hawaii is home to some of the best beaches in the world.

-There are an abundance of activities to keep you busy, from hiking and surfing to exploring volcanoes and snorkeling with sea turtles.

 

The Cons Of Retiring In Hawaii

Of course, there are also some drawbacks to retiring in Hawaii. One of the biggest downsides is the high cost of living. Without a doubt, Hawaii is one of the most expensive states - housing, food, household goods, and transportation can all be very expensive. Additionally, healthcare costs are also quite high. And while the climate is generally mild, Hawaii does experience hurricanes and tropical storms from time to time, so you'll need to be prepared for that as well.

The downside of retiring in Hawaii are:

-Living in Hawaii can be expensive. Prices for everything from groceries to housing are high.

-The cost of living can vary greatly from one island to another.

-While the weather is usually beautiful, Hawaii does experience hurricanes and tropical storms from time to time.

- Despite the cost of gas being the highest of any state, public transportation here is limited to public buses and there are no trains, light rail, or subways in any of the urban areas

- If you are afraid of active volcanoes disrupting your life then this is also something you should consider. However, while a lot of people think that this is a big deal, Hawaii residents know that most of the islands - aside from Hawaii itself - are now dormant.

 

 

Tips For Raising A Family In Hawaii

Retirement isn't the only scenario for moving to Hawaii of course. Many families love raising kids in paradise too. If you're thinking of making the move to Hawaii with your family, here are a few things to keep in mind.

What To Know If You Plan To Raise A Family Here

-One of the biggest challenges of raising a family in Hawaii is finding affordable housing. Due to the high cost of living, many families end up living in tight quarters or even moving outside of Honolulu to more affordable areas on other islands.

-Another challenge can be finding adequate childcare and schools for your kids. Because Hawaii is such a popular tourist destination, many service industries like childcare and housekeeping are very busy and can be challenging to find availability.

-But despite these challenges, there are also many wonderful things about raising a family in Hawaii. The state has some of the best public beaches in the country, and there are plenty of opportunities for outdoor activities like hiking, surfing, and camping. The climate is also very mild, which means kids can play outside year-round.

- Hawaii is the only state to have a single, unified state-wide public education system. Despite the high cost of living in the state, Hawaii's public schools are poorly funded and fall far below the national average in terms of test scores. As a result, many families that can afford private schools chose that option instead.

Raising a family in Hawaii comes with its own set of challenges, from finding affordable housing to securing childcare. But despite these challenges, there are also many wonderful things about raising a family in the state. From the beautiful beaches to the mild climate, there are plenty of reasons to love Hawaii. And if you're up for the challenge, it can be an amazing place to raise a family.

 

Hawaiian Cultural History That Mainlanders Don't Always Understand

When moving to Hawaii, it's important to understand the culture and history of the islands. Unfortunately, many Mainlanders or ʻāina ʻāina in the Hawaiian language don't always have a clear understanding of Hawaiian culture and history. This can lead to tension and even conflict between locals and newcomers.

In fact, beyond the word ʻāina ʻāina for people from the mainland, there is another Hawaiian word, Haole that refers to individuals with an ancestry that is neither Native Hawaiian or Polynesian. Cultural traditions and language like this are a reminder that no matter how long you live in Hawaii ... you will always be considered an outsider to some folks.

This is one of the biggest cultural differences that not everyone understands. However, it is a very important thing to know before choosing to move to Hawaii.

Hawaiian culture is steeped in tradition and spirituality. For centuries, Native Hawaiians have practiced their own unique religion, which today reflects the diversity of cultures that have played an influence on the culture here. Hawaiian spiritual beliefs are centered around reverence for the land and ancestors. Many Hawaiian cultural traditions are still practiced today, including hula dancing, surfing, lei making, and luau feasts but the authentic versions remain very unique compared to what is often shared with wealthy tourists on vacation.

The history of Hawaii is also complex and often misunderstood by Mainlanders. The islands have a long history of colonization, first by the British, then the Americans, and most recently by the Japanese during World War II. This history has led to a complex relationship between the Hawaiian people and the US government. In recent years there has been a movement to return sovereignty back to the Hawaiian people, but this is a long and complicated process.

If you're thinking of moving to Hawaii, it's important to do your research and understand the culture and history of the islands. With its unique mix of cultures and beautiful landscapes, Hawaii is an amazing place to call your new home. But it's also important to remember that as an outsider, you will always be considered an outsider by some folks. And that's okay. Because at the end of the day, Hawaii is a place full of aloha.

 

Managing High Costs Of Living

For many people, the high cost of living is one of the biggest challenges of moving to Hawaii. The state has a higher cost of living than anywhere else in the US, with housing, food, and transportation costs all being significantly higher than the national average. In fact, the cost of living in Hawaii is nearly twice the national average, and housing costs are often three times the cost of other parts of the country. Despite this though, Hawaii has one of the lowest poverty rates in the United States.

For example, the average home price in Hawaii is $873,318 and in Honolulu, Hawaii's capital and most expensive city, the average rent is $1627. This is an expensive place to live and you'll be reminded of that every time you go to the grocery store or buy a plate lunch. However, just like in places like Southern California, while real estate and other costs are costly - this is still one of the best places to live and the warm climate makes daily life here more enjoyable.

However, the high cost of living can be especially challenging for families or individuals on a fixed income. And while there are ways to save money by shopping at local markets or eating at home more often, it's important to be realistic about what your budget will look like in Hawaii.

If you're thinking of moving to Hawaii, it's important to be realistic about your finances and understand that the cost of living is significantly higher than in other parts of the US. However, with careful budgeting and a willingness to live a more simple lifestyle, it is possible to make Hawaii your home.

So, there you have it! A few things to know before moving to Hawaii. Whether you're looking to retire in paradise or raise a family in the Aloha State, there's something for everyone in Hawaii. Just be sure to do your research and understand the unique culture and history of the islands before making the move. And most importantly, remember that aloha is always waiting for you in Hawaii. Mahalo!

 

You Are A Long Ways From The Mainland

The Hawaiian Islands are often referred to as the most isolated archipelago in the world. They extend across the middle of the Pacific Ocean and are approximately 2,390 miles from California and 3,850 miles from Japan. And while this isolation has lead to some amazing things (like the unique culture and natural beauty of the islands), it also means that you're a long ways from the mainland. This can be a good or bad thing, depending on your perspective.

This distance is even starker when it comes to the time difference. Hawaii Time Zone sits +3 hours from the Pacific (California, Oregon, and Washington State).

For many people, being so far from the mainland is one of the best things about living in Hawaii. This gives them a sense of detachment from the rest of the world and allows them to focus on what's important to them. Others find it isolating and frustrating, especially when they need to travel for business or pleasure.

In the past, this was even more isolating since phone calls and mail were slow and expensive. Today though, with internet communication and cell phones it is much easier for people to move here and still feel connected to family and friends back home.

If you're thinking of moving to Hawaii, it's important to consider how you feel about being so far from the mainland. For some people, it's one of the best things about living in Hawaii. Others find it isolating. But with modern technology, it is easier than ever to stay connected to the people and places you love.

 

Final thoughts On Relocating To The Aloha State

If you're thinking of moving to Hawaii, congratulations! You're about to embark on a wonderful journey filled with Hawaiian shirts and new neighbors.

From figuring out which island is right for you to understand the pros and cons of retiring in Hawaii, this guide will give you all the information you need to make your move to the Aloha State. And if you're moving with kids, we've got some great tips on raising a family in Hawaii too.

So what are you waiting for? Start planning your dream move to Hawaii today! Aloha!

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